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Abstract

This paper examines the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on return migrants. The rapid spread of the pandemic caught countries across the world off guard, resulting in widespread lockdowns that clamped down on mobility, commercial activities and social interactions. 5.52 lakh people returned to Kerala from abroad by loss of jobs. By the way the paper aims to analyse limitations of public policy in addressing return migrants and suggest recommendations for the way ahead and to shed light on the vulnerability of India’s immigrants in terms of their health rights and social security. It is expected that, there could be 10 to 15% decline in remittance in the current fiscal (Irudaya Rajan, Chair Professor at the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs Research Unit on International Migration, at the Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram). Finally the paper will be demonstrating every area of life of return migrants by poorly implemented or discriminatory government policies.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Dr. Shajila beevi. S, “SOCIAL SECURITY AND HEALTH RIGHTS OF RETURN MIGRANTS DURING PANDEMIC”, IEJRD - International Multidisciplinary Journal, vol. 6, no. 5, p. 5, Sep. 2021.

References

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